Is Witchcraft Evil? Debunking Myths

Witchcraft has always had a bad reputation even to this day, and leads many to the question: is witchcraft evil?  

Good and evil are apparent in all religions, spiritual groups, and within humanity in general. In everyday life, we are met with opportunities to proceed in dark or light, whether we practice witchcraft or not. It is the unique path of the individual who makes that choice, whether to learn the deepest secrets kept hidden in the darkness or to capture the light of an everlasting truth within. 

Leaves

Remember, to meet the lightest, brightest parts of you, you must first know the dark, and equally, to reach your highest, lightest self, you must have met your darkest lowest vibrations to reach spiritual equilibrium. This is also true within your craft, and a knowledgable witch understands the need for both dark and light.

Where did the evil paradigm begin

In early Christian Europe, witches were perceived as evil beings, which later inspired the Halloween iconic figure. Ugly, scary, and covered in boils was a clever ruse by the patriarchy to repel people from becoming a witch, or to ever befriend or love one. 

The image of a witch has been changed throughout history, and one of the most popular is that of a witch huddled over a cauldron, with the eye of newt and puppy dog’s tails. This is far from the truth, most witches, especially in Wicca, respect all living things and look after Mother Earth.

They are not haggard old women cackling away on a broomstick, these images were brewed up into existence by those who opposed witchcraft, through fear, lack of awareness, and power struggles between the church and the people.

Witch on a broomstick

Pop culture has also delivered a narrative of what the witch is, as a nose twitching suburban housewife, or a teenage girl struggling through high school on the back end of spells gone awry. Anything to keep the true power of a witch in a comical or scary paradigm is used to keep us from our true powers.

The Origins of Witchcraft

Early witches were people who practiced spells and called upon spirits to bring about a wanted change. They were thought to be pagans doing the devil’s work. Although this is far from the truth as many of the witches were healers, midwives, herbalists and medicine makers. This was not well received by the patriarchal rise of the church, who wanted full control.

For witches, their past has been a dark and painful history and was often deadly for most, who would not hide their magic and fought for their freedom of powers attained by practicing the craft.

Even in modern-day culture, patriarchal systems, set up many moons ago were put in place to keep us compliant, to fear each other, and to forget our ancestral knowledge of the underlying power that we all hold inside. 

Our magic that has been pitched as evil, unworthy and unnatural, actually allows us to harness the very essence of nature and the undercurrent of whispered messages to all who dare to listen.

The Burning Times and True Evil

Witch hysteria took hold in Europe in the 1400s targeting mostly single and widowed women eventually followed by men and married women, who were tortured, hunted, and killed. Which leads to the question of who was really evil at this time? As during the 1500s up until 1630 a suspected 50,000, male and female witches were burnt at the stake or hanged.

Witches then grew to be wary of one another and their awareness of their craft, leading to the great separation. Forcing them to take their practices underground, in fear of their life, which in turn began the narrative that witchcraft is dark and practiced only in the shadows.

Evil witch

The evil was not those of witches, but those who taped shut the mouths of the awakened ones, the healers and the wise folk, all to gain power and control and tarnished the name of a witch.

It is time to claim the name – Witch 

Some witches practice dark (black) magic and some practice light (white) magic, but to put witchcraft into either category is not as simple, as witches understand that the for the universe to obtain balance, it works in both light and dark and all of the spectra in between.

In modern-day ‘the burning times’ have transmuted from the physical act of the inquisition, public executions, torture, and shame, to the sly projection of inward fear of ourselves, our beliefs and most of all our power. 

We are led to question our every move constantly assessing whether we would be judged for being evil and unworthy. Fearing each other has now become the norm, competing and judging each other for our path, and this is where the witch wound lies.

Practice calling yourself a witch, let it roll off your tongue, imagine telling others, “I’m a witch”, how does that feel? If there are any times or places where it feels wrong, use that trigger in shadow work and begin to unravel and challenge the reasons why.

Conclusion 

The witch wound is prevalent all over the world and we can feel this pain within the rise and the awakening of witches. We must begin to heal this wound together, and the more we are seen the safer we are.

The more that others see that witches are not evil and may hold the key to a world in turmoil, showing humanity the path back to oneness within ourselves and within the planet, the more we will become whole.

Today there is a call, we are all feeling this call, back to our roots as witches, healers, and wise folk, and this regression shouldn’t be seen as a step back, but rather just as an arrow is pulled back to be propelled into action.